in the poor house

in the poor house

The New York City Farm Colony was a poorhouse on the New York City borough of Staten Island, one of the city's five boroughs. It was located across Brielle Avenue from Sea View Hospital, on the edge of the Staten Island Greenbelt.

The land was taken over by the government of Richmond County in 1829 and the Richmond County Poor Farm was established thereon. When Staten Island became a borough of New York City in 1898, the city assumed responsibility for the property and redesignated it the New York City Farm Colony, although it was sometimes also referred to as the Staten Island Farm Colony. In 1915, its administration was merged with that of Seaview Hospital, which had been set up with the expressed purpose of treating tuberculosis, under the new name of Sea View Farms - sounding quite promising.

As the NY Times wrote, today it could be the "lost city" in some theme park. In the jungle-like overgrowth a visitor can see only 10 or 20 feet. Every 100 feet or so stone ruins loom. But there are no guides and admission is free.
Ref:
Date:
location
staten island, ny
photographer
patrick connolly
in the poor house

in the poor house

The New York City Farm Colony was a poorhouse on the New York City borough of Staten Island, one of the city's five boroughs. It was located across Brielle Avenue from Sea View Hospital, on the edge of the Staten Island Greenbelt.

The land was taken over by the government of Richmond County in 1829 and the Richmond County Poor Farm was established thereon. When Staten Island became a borough of New York City in 1898, the city assumed responsibility for the property and redesignated it the New York City Farm Colony, although it was sometimes also referred to as the Staten Island Farm Colony. In 1915, its administration was merged with that of Seaview Hospital, which had been set up with the expressed purpose of treating tuberculosis, under the new name of Sea View Farms - sounding quite promising.

As the NY Times wrote, today it could be the "lost city" in some theme park. In the jungle-like overgrowth a visitor can see only 10 or 20 feet. Every 100 feet or so stone ruins loom. But there are no guides and admission is free.
Ref:
Date:
location
staten island, ny
photographer
patrick connolly